Intraventricular Hemorrhage

What is Intraventricular Hemorrhage (IVH)?

Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a serious condition involving bleeding within or around the ventricles, the areas of the brain containing cerebral spinal fluid. This condition most often affects premature infants. The specific cause is unknown, but may be a result of insufficient oxygen to the brain or complications during delivery. Almost all cases in infants develop within the first three days of life. Intraventricular hemorrhage may also occur in adults due to trauma, tumors, or ruptured anyeurysms or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

Symptoms of Intraventricular Hemorrhage

Symptoms of intraventricular hemorrhage vary for each patient, but may include:

  • Headache
  • Coma
  • Slowed heart rate
  • Slowed breathing
  • Pale or blue coloring
  • High-pitched cry (in infants)
  • Seizures
  • Anemia

If left untreated, hemorrhaging may lead to permanent brain damage. The amount of bleeding in patients with intraventricular hemorrhage can vary and may be classified by grade, with most cases falling into Grade 1 or 2.

Treatment and Surgery for Intraventricular Hemorrhage

WARNING: If patients or healthcare providers suspect an intraventricular hemorrhage, emergent neurosurgical evaluation is warranted!

Specific treatment for intraventricular hemorrhage focuses on treating conditions that may worsen hemorrhaging. A shunt may be placed to manage increased intraventricular pressure caused by blood accumulation.  When intraventricular hemorrhages are caused by ruptured blood vessels such as in a ruptured aneurysm or AVM, intracranial or endovascular repair may be warranted.

At Princeton Neurological Surgery, Dr. Lipani is a board certified fellowship trained neurosurgeon in New Jersey and specialist in the treatment for intraventricular hemorrhage. Dr. Lipani treats patients from around the world as well as locally from Princeton, New Brunswick, Hopewell, Pennington and communities throughout Somerset, Middlesex, Ocean, Burlington, Monmouth, Morris and Mercer Counties for intraventricular hemorrhage. Dr. Lipani offers image guided brain surgery approaches for intraventricular hemorrhage treatment, tailored to the needs of each patient. For state-of-the-art intraventricular hemorrhage treatment call or email us to schedule a consultation at our offices in Hamilton, Bridgewater, or Morristown, New Jersey!

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Dr. Lipani’s affiliation with several major New Jersey hospitals means that you will receive the intraventricular hemorrhage surgery you need without having to travel to New York or Philadelphia. Dr. Lipani has over 15 years of experience performing brain and spine surgeries, so you can count on him to provide the best possible quality of care to all his patients.

If you would like more information about our services or to schedule an appointment, feel free to fill out our convenient contact form or call us directly at 609-890-3400.

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